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"Noughts & Crosses" by Levi Washington

Review

Thankfully after managing to catch up with Levi Washington's weekly singles release campaign with "On The Wrong Side Of The Sunshine" last week (I was several days late with "Soph" the previous one), thanks to a timely heads up from the artist himself, I am delighted to start the week by telling you about "Noughts & Crosses", his offering for the next seven days (it's becoming an interesting variant on a sort of weekly Advent calendar now).

Once again (I bet you have already spotted the pattern), it's a shift in tone as well as sound for the new week. Frankly, I doubt if even the most avid Levi fan could process too many songs with the bleakness of "On The Wrong Side Of The Sunshine" in a row and with the run up to a festive period now underway, the collective capacity for too much of that side of life is limited: one track is great: it showed Levi's values, desire to chronicle the depths of despair and his ability to do so authentically and sympathetically. Two however & I think we might all be in danger in following the protagonist into darker places.

"Noughts & Crosses", musically at least, is yet another of Levi's fascinating hybrids, wherein he takes elements from a variety of the musical styles he plays so well & melds them into something entirely of its own nature. There are regular flashes of guitar pitched somewhere between Ernie Isley & Lenny Kravitz: little curled up, funky riffs which tease us with promises of extending themselves for the first two minutes before rewarding our patience by heading off into a glorious solo. The rest of the music isn't especially like either of those artists: it's a dense take on contemporary R&B with those nods to vintage soul and rock giving an edge and character.

As I say, the arrangement and mix are pretty compact, with really only the guitar cutting itself a path through. The vocals sit squarely in the midst of the sound and while this gives the whole an admirable sense of cohesion and unity, the lyrics take a few plays to begin to decipher. But it's time well spent in my opinion & since it's very danceable, you can try doing a bit of that too while replaying it.

As far as I can tell, the song appears to be a sort of companion piece to "Soph" with parallel advice to a young woman seeking to chart her way through the shoals of life: the consequent and natural ups and downs and presumably the duality of experiences implied by the song's title. There may even be a bit of angel/devil dichotomy going on. Once again, the emphasis seems to be upon empathy and that's certainly a very major thread (quite possibly the single most important one) which binds together this series of releases which otherwise would perhaps seem intimidatingly diverse & unconnected.

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'Mermaid' EP by Paradise of the Titans

Review

When, about a month ago, I reviewed the inaugural live performance of Ian Todd's excellent new album "Seven Signs of a Soul" at the Tin, I did mention in strong terms how impressed I was by support act Paradise of the Titans.

A large part of what I do in reviewing local music is to introduce myself to great new artists whom I hadn't previously heard so I can not only pass the good news onto you, but revel in their talent myself. Inevitably, it takes a stroke of luck such as catching an artist I'd not heard before supporting one I knew rather better (and over the years this route has introduced me to many subsequent favourites) and under such circumstances I have no compunction about holding my hands up when I come late to a particular musician or band.

In this case, after the gig, I checked out the most recent Paradise of the Titans release, the ‘Mermaid' EP and so enjoyed it that I feel I ought to share it with you, however belatedly it that might turn out to be compared with my intended usual response time: in fact I gather it won't be long before I can tell you about their latest EP which I gather is currently being recorded.

As with my live review, I say "their" when some of the time the band is really a solo act for Alice Weston, the brains and creative talent behind the band name. In fact I had really to check this aspect out with her as I was a little confused, seeing just her onstage yet the online description is as a duo. In fact it's even more complicated than that. I think we can safely put the central core of Paradise of the Titans down as being Alice with her bringing onboard collaborators as appropriate. The EP thus features Sarah Scouller on keyboards & I am advised that for the next release (plus associated live performances), Alice is joined by a drummer and a synth player, making them, for a time at least, a trio.

Regrettably, as far as I'm concerned, reviewing later than others means they use all the best descriptions first and I end up trying to find new angles rather than simply repeat others' articulation. However, when publications as prestigious as LouderThanWar have reviewed a record, that in itself tells you the regard in which it is held: and their assessment is glowing

I know those reading reviews appreciate having some sort of signpost towards what I'm talking about, but as many previous reviews have stated, I do have a penchant for elusive artists who are too slippery (as a true mermaid must be) to pin to a single genre category. When you can't even easily establish the size of the band, such qualities are enhanced.

I guess Alice must have influences (I am fairly happy in spotting some aspects of Kate Bush in her live performance style as I said last time) but musically I can't definitely state what they could be. I honestly don't think it matters: we need to take this very idiosyncratic music purely on its own terms and rejoice yet again that in the current vibrant creative pot which exists in Coventry and Warwickshire music, we have someone wholly unique. That's what really excites me.

You can't easily dissect who Alice & crew create the actual songs, let alone work out precisely what she is trying to tell us: at one level this simply drives us back to repeated listens to try to decode it (no bad thing for a musician) but even so, I think the overall effect is more impressionistic than figurative.

Alice seems to revel in various aspects of the other worldly & transcendental. A lot of her work (including visuals) seems extra-terrestrial in inspiration, yet here she evokes the mysteries & mythos of The Deep (I understand that her next EP will bring in robots). Clearly such beings will not necessarily share our languages nor aesthetics and so it's wholly appropriate that precision of meaning remain elusive. There are a lot of mysteries involved in Alice's work & I think she is challenging us as much to explore them as necessarily solving them.

The title track, which leads the EP off, is a solemn piece which appears to have been transmitted upwards from the sea bed, through the waters & not only emanating from creatures not speaking English, but distorted and mutated by the element it is travelling through (the vocals would appear reversed to achieve this effect in part). It has a dignity and sadness which possibly speaks for aeons of seeing wrecks & loss. The keyboard sounds would seem to be created from vintage machines and although this normally means making a song sound 1980s/90s which can be very distracting in some cases, with Paradise of the Titans you just get them used tastefully to tell the story in hand without at all sounding like an exercise in nostalgia.

Track two, "Rainmaker" is another aquatic themed track, though this time we are out of the ocean & feeling the water from above us. Again the combination of ethereal (I have held off using the term until now but it has to be deployed at some stage in a Paradise of the Titans review) voices and minimalistic keyboard sounds (I assume portraying droplets) have a n exquisite effect: there is sun glinting through the rain, though the latter still serves as a curtain to filter the words between what can be understood & something just out of comprehension.

"Walkman"  makes much more overt the slightly eastern tints I perceived in "Rainmaker": here you get much more obviously oriental instrumental sounds: you can imagine yourself wandering around underneath the cherry trees and if you again can't quite understand what Alice is singing about: how could you expect to if in an exotic land whose language you know little of?

Final track "Boudica" fits the others in terms of emotional landscape: I'm not at all sure where she is on this one (a cave seems a distinct possibility)though water could well be involved again, nor what the title means in the context of the song: which brings us neatly round to my central point: it doesn't matter. With Paradise of the Titans I don't want to have a perfect, objective "understanding" of the songs: but I do much appreciate being led on a journey a little out of my comfort zone and experience on which I am invited to figure things out for myself & to draw my own conclusions.

As I say, a unique voice, a unique talent & one I'm delighted to have serendipitously encountered. I look forwards to sharing the new EP with you as soon as it's out.

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"Don't Stop. Live A Lot" by Dave Pepper

Review

Following the raunch of his most recent release from earlier in the month, "Rub Rub Grind", Dave Pepper is back with his new single "Don't Stop. Live A Lot" which came out today.

Just as his last song was in distinct contrast to its own predecessor, "I Need More Time", so this one takes a different course again: in fact it's interesting how Dave seems to be sharing an idea with Levi Washington at present in putting out frequent singles with very contrasting themes (though neither is quite up to Dave's old bandmate Daffod'i'll in terms of prolific releasing at the moment). Whereas Levi of course is also exploring a range of styles within his sequence, Dave is generally re-exploring his sounds of forty years ago as detailed in my previous reviews.  "Don't Stop. Live A Lot" certainly falls within that strategy, though by itself it's certainly no bland exercise in nostalgia nor retro for the sake of retro. Inspired by the excitement  of 1970s/early 80s Peppermusic, this is no pastiche of it. Rather Dave draws elements together which probably are best described as being there in his music during that broad time period but not necessarily at the same time. Hence there are snarly guitar hints of early 1970s hard rock spliced with keyboard playing which evokes his I and Courtiers of Fashion days. Taken as a whole, the feel sits somewhere in the territory of more poppy punk and post-punk.

That then is the music (and it's catchy for sure: you get the benefits of the experience of writing of someone who's been honing this for over four decades). The title pretty much speaks for the lyrics and I suppose it is a sort of companion piece to "Rub Rub Grind" in that it speaks to us of seizing the moment and making the most of life (and possibly both in their own ways also complement "I Need More Time" in respect of how to find a way to chart yourself through the vicissitudes of life and loss), though certainly not necessarily in the very specific way of that track. It is also I suspect likely to get a bit more airplay given it's less "adult" content.

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"On The Wrong Side Of The Sunshine" by Levi Washington

Review

Having been too slow in my response to last week's Levi Washington single "Soph", thanks in part to a heads up from the artist himself (thank you Levi), I'm able to greet "On The Wrong Side Of The Sunshine" as he releases it.

As you might expect by now, it has a distinct sound to "Soph" and once again, the emotional emphasis has shifted. I suppose that one might make a case for suggesting that Levi partially prepared us for today's song as "Soph" was rather a sad story, though the leap is substantial as "On The Wrong Side Of The Sunshine" is not so much sad as bleak, dealing with the theme of "…..hanging on by a thread and cursing the thread you hang on…".

As he is advancing towards the festive season week by week with these songs, I think it's fair to say that he has made a wise choice by sharing this song now and not say in the third week of December. It would certainly cause a stir then, but it would pretty much put a dampener on a supposed time of celebration already haunted by COVID19 etc.

Not that it comes across as any sort of barrel of laughs in the last week of November: you simply can't get round its essential existential angst, delivered by Levi in a vocal sound which has clearly been shaped to distance, or frankly alienate himself and the listener from the more enjoyable aspects of life. It's all a far cry from the warmth of how he sings on say "Shelter" or "My Own Way": imagine in your head perhaps the sound Peter Gabriel has often gone for, but with additional yelps of pain embellishing it.

The instrumental backing for this is pretty sparse (though there is a curious guitar part a little deep in the mix which occasionally chirrups in a way somewhat reminiscent of that ubiquitous "sleigh bell" sound I suspect we're going to be hearing far too much of very soon. This may be Levi's injection of a bit of dark humour to leaven the song, or just my imagination, but it certainly helps add an interesting layer of irony). Otherwise the sound tends towards Pink Floyd at their most Roger Waters-shaped gloomy (think ‘The Final Cut' era).

It's not an easy nor comfortable listen: as the man himself says "…enjoy if possible…" and possibly enjoyment is a tough ask, but one can surely appreciate and respect what he is trying to say. The subjects of despair and potential self harm are not easy ones to write about, especially in a "popular" context, but they exist and Levi obviously feels that he has a moral obligation to tackle the subjects and not just turn a blind eye to them: at the very least this song acknowledges the suffering of others and pays them the respect of neither ignoring them nor stigmatising them. He may not possess answers to the issues, but he doesn't flinch from demonstrating his support either.

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"Soph" by Levi Washington

Review

The main problem with trying to review the more prolific releasers of new music locally is actually keeping up with them. Although I knew in theory that Levi Washington was still sharing one a week, I hold my hands up & apologise to you for being a few days late in telling you about "Soph": in fact it presumably won't be long until her successor appears..

In fact the song was actually played on BBC Introducing for Coventry & Warwickshire some months ago, so you may well have heard it already, but now Levi has mastered it & given it a formal release.

If you've been attending to this campaign, you'll be aware of its defining characteristics. Put aside please (in my opinion anyway) the notion of this being a deliberate showcase for Levi to demonstrate the ease with which he can compose and perform in a wide range of genres (though he most certainly can): I consider that the truth is that he simply writes what's in his heart at any given moment & then applies the most suitable musical template to each composition: and he simply has a lot of musical interests & chops from which to select. What's important is that he sounds convincing in each genre and isn't just some sort of musical grandstander. I haven't yet come across any single in which he sounds less that fully sincere & that is a central part of his personal genius. Deeper down though, I wonder if he is stimulated by the challenges of playing in so many styles? Some artists do have this restlessness (Dave Pepper is a fine example) and almost motivational need to explore & express themselves diversely.

Unfortunately, I've struggled with "Soph"… while undeniably different in style to "My Own Way" , "Shelter", "Focus" and  "Polaroids of Yesteryear", I am not at all sure how to describe its style. Normally I hate labelling any music & until I started writing about it, didn't make much effort to do so. While those remain my principles, I do however accept that as a reviewer I do owe my readers some obligation to try & describe the music I'm reviewing to them.

Clearly addressing the person whose name provides the title, the song is gentle in tone but still too upbeat & jaunty to be called a ballad: it has strong pop credentials but the lyrics weave such a complex picture & the length of five minutes rather stretch what the op police normally permit: indeed one of the strengths of the song is that Levi holds our attention for so long.

I don't know how much "Soph" is modelled on an actual person: if not, he's certainly gone to considerable lengths to give details about her character and experiences. Given the level of concern & sympathy evinced, I'd be inclined to think that somewhere in there is someone he cares for.

It's another beautiful, catchy song & certainly the sort of track which deserves to be a single, irrespective of my limited ability to tell you what it sounds like. Perhaps you might go & have a listen yourself and then you'll be able to form your own opinion. It will not be a waster five minutes I can assure you.

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"Petrichor" by Monday Nights

Review

You will I'm sure be aware of the debut single from Monday Nights, "Flight" which also appears on ‘Hot Music Live Presents Volume Five'. They have now released its follow-up "Petrichor", which is out today.

If, as I am, you are unfamiliar with the title of the song, I'm advised that it refers to "a pleasant smell that frequently accompanies the first rain after a long period of warm dry weather": a useful word to know & for that alone I am grateful to them.

When I first interviewed them for the magazine just under a year ago, they expressed hopes for releases in early 2021: understandably that didn't come quite to pass, but the wait has been worth it: the quality of the song trumps the delay in importance & it's much better to ensure that it was made under the best possible conditions in order to burnish their growing reputation in its relative early stages. This is played with taste & restraint as well as talent, with passionate and articulate vocals: even better than that, it possesses heart.

An upbeat number, it's expressed desire to "soar" links it to its predecessor as does the upwardly aspirational feel to it. Monday Nights have only released two songs in their nascent career but each is so well crafted and uplifting that the outlook for their career in most encouraging: great songs which touch hearts & leave you feeling better at the end than you did before hearing them deserve big audiences.

Talking of which, Monday Nights have recently re-emerged back onto the live scene, getting out of both lockdown and their home base in Rugby: it's great to see them getting gigs now in Leamington as well as the good news about their talent spreads.

The single's name will attract attention (never a bad idea) but that is merely the starting point: once you've heard it, the real impact will happen and I look forward to catching them and reviewing them live: a whole set of such material would be most impressive.

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"The Lucky One" by Joe Dolman

Review

After the recent releases of "Real World" and "Strangers" in the past few weeks, both of which have no only been reviewed in this magazine but well received by his large fanbase, Joe Dolman is spoiling us with yet another new single today, namely "The Lucky One".

If that title sounds a little familiar, then you may be thinking of the current Kenzie Webley single which has an identical title: how unusual is that for two artists from the same area to choose precisely the same wording for a release at the same time? It must signify something surely. I'm not aware that either song has influenced the other in title, content nor sound though.

This "The Lucky One" is in fact about Joe's Dad & I am so pleased to hear it for several reasons. As regular followers of my reviews of his work will know, while applauding the quality of his recent releases, I several times expressed concern about his general state of happiness as evidenced by their lyrics: there was an awful lot of beating himself up over ended relationships and missed opportunities within them. Of course he is a very skilled & experienced songwriter and there is no reason at all to suppose that he was necessarily writing from personal (current) experiences: he could easily be writing from an imagined standpoint or from his own history. I just felt a bit bad for him that he seemed perpetually a bit sad with life: something I must say I have no strong reason to believe is the case in actuality. This switch therefore to a different subject altogether cheers me up on his behalf straight away, and it's arguable that a change in theme was due.

There is no doubt at all however in the case of "The Lucky One" that this is no song in character: this is Joe speaking without filters, directly from his heart and I think this brings out the best in him & accentuates the qualities in his music I imagine his many admirers particularly cherish.

I don't mind in the slightest saying here that it's my own favourite not only of his recent work but of everything he's done so far. Part of that is the song's personal resonances for me (and the best songs do touch individuals in very powerful & discrete ways) but also because I think one might argue that he has been building towards this through his career: gradually lowering the defences of his writing to produce something as open & heartfelt as this. I'd say that I am probably echoing Joe's own thoughts on the matter, as he says: "….this one really is the most special to me yet. For as long as I can remember, my dad has always been my role model….Putting into words how much he means to me felt impossible; this song has been 3 years in the making but it's finally ready to release and I couldn't be prouder". Justifiably so in my opinion. The length of time he has been crafting it alone tells you the intensity of its meaning to him. Time well spent.

The theme is essentially enumerating the qualities he sees in his Dad while articulating how lucky he feels to have him in his life, with the strong message of how important it is to say these things when the subject is still around to hear them: how many times do people think "I wish I'd told him/her how much they meant to me" after it's too late? It's a vital message & as you'd expect, delivered exquisitely, within a typically stripped back & elegant arrangement and emotionally exposed performance, building to the charged crescendo that it deserves. When this is played live, there will not be many dry eyes in the house I suspect.

Talking of live performance, don't forget his concert at All Saint's Church in Leamington on December 17th. I'm predicting magic in the air.

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King of the Alps live

Review

Last night was another little milestone for me: my first pub-based gig for two years. As you might imagine, it took an exceptional act to tempt me, and in this case it was King of the Alps whose great new single "Time Goes So Slow" I reviewed five days ago. It was also my first chance to see Paul Ingram & Simon Ward play live with new group member Sally Laws & the gig totally lived up to my high expectations.

Performing within the context of Rich Keogh's open mic at The Avenue in Leamington (currently named "Fifteen"), the band were on excellent form. They don't play live too often, but I suppose this rarity simply adds an extra veneer of value for aficionados.

Sally's addition to the lineup has one of those "this was meant to be" qualities. Paul tells me that in fact much of his writing has had a sense of creating opportunities for him to harmonise with a female voice & in the past both Izzie Derry & Ellie Gowers have added vocals on recordings (which tells you something about the esteem the band are held in), though obviously neither can easily perform live with the band (though check out my live review from July 2019 when Izzie was able to join them for "Helter Skelter"). Now Sally is able to perform those parts on a regular basis as well as adding her own original vocal take on current songs, not least "Time Goes So Slow". In fact, although we've been waiting for the new King of the Alps album ‘Heart of the Matter' for ages and despite that collection being considered near completion some time ago, Paul also advises that such is Sally's impact on the group that they are revisiting the recordings so as to maximise her contributions & enhance what they already had: so that will be an extra treat to look forwards to.

Unsurprisingly, the current single was in the set, and worked well, despite, as I mentioned a few days ago, their lineup being unable to reproduce all the layers of recorded instrumentation live especially keyboards and drums (it's ironic especially about the latter since Paul still sees himself as primarily a drummer). However I'm told that they have a plan to resolve this, the details of which will be resolved in due course. In the meantime, as I suspected, "Time Goes So Slow" works very well in stripped back form. Proud as the band are of their detailed recorded arrangements, I still think that the strength of the beautiful trademark melodies (and it's worth emphasising here the considerable contribution Simon's bass playing makes to the melodic complexity as well as that instrument's more conventional roles) come through even more strongly in the simpler live arrangements. I think each set offers different yet complementary perspectives on the song.

In a necessarily short set, as I say we got "Time Goes So Slow", plus the tracks "Beauty of the Rain" and "Helter Skelter" where we have already heard female vocals  on record but for me the revelation was "Wonderful Day": a single from June this year & destined for the new album. I gather the band were a little apprehensive of how this would work live (if you know the song, you'll appreciate how central the drum part is to the arrangement) but it was a triumph: Sally's vocals here took an already outstanding song & elevated it still further. I can well imagine that they will want very much to incorporate these into the album version of the song.

The band seem very excited about where they are going & so am I: there is a definite sense of kicking into still higher a gear & producing yet more exquisite music. Look out for the new album but also for some more live dates which they are currently working on for the last part of 2021.

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Old and gold

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"Time Goes So Slow" by King of the Alps

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"Rub Rub Grind" by Dave Pepper

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"Third Degree (Acoustic)" by Ivy Ash

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"Third Degree" by Ivy Ash

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"My Own Way" by Levi Washington

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‘Red Rose SPD Way' and 'SMILE' by Daffod'i'll

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Ian Todd supported by Paradise of the Titans

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"Wes Finch: A Life in Music" by Russell Whitehead

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"Shelter" and "Focus" by Levi Washington

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Overpass - Debut UK Headline Tour & Single

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"I Need More Time" by Dave Pepper

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"Psychic Visions" by Massasauga

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'Black Narcissus' by Daffod'i'll

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"Good Girl" by Rheo Uno

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‘No Hope Without Love' EP by The Rising

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If you have been reading my more recent reviews of The Rising, then it will not be news to you that they've been steadily releasing each of the ...

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"Strangers" by Joe Dolman

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"Wishing Well" by Danny Ansell

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"Smile" by Avidfan

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‘After the Fire' by Blue Moon Birds

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"HIGHHIGHHIGH" by Euan Blackman

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‘Protest Songs 1924-2012' by The Specials

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Barnabus - The Nelson Club, Warwick

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'Brown Nosey' by Daffod'i'll

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"Under Me" by Abz Winter

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"The Lucky One" by Kenzie Webley

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For those of you who were wondering about the activities of that rapidly rising local star Kenzie Webley, I am able to bring you up to speed.

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The Catenary Wires, Pete Astor, The Pristines and The Sunbathers

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Beans on Toast ‘SURVIVAL OF THE FRIENDLIEST'

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