Hot
Music
Live
The magazine for local live music
Coventry, Kenilworth, Leamington Spa, Rugby, Solihull, Warwick, Stratford and Warwickshire

The magazine - news, reviews and interviews for the local scene

Fresh and funky

'The Sun Will Rise Again' by King of the Alps

Review

Every so often, I enthuse in a review for "Hot Music Live" over the privileges of being able to do so: fairly obviously hearing wonderful & original music, often a little before it is released etc. To that I can add the odd "magic moment" such as this morning when anticipating being able to review the brand new EP by King of the Alps & greatly looking forward to doing so maybe in the next week or so, lo & behold Paul Ingram of that group turned up on my doorstep to hand deliver a copy & so you get to read my thoughts even earlier than planned.

It has been the busiest year ever for the band as this is their second EP of 2019. You may remember my reviewing ‘Beauty Scarred' back in April (and this in turn spawned the really well received singles "Beauty of the Rain" (featuring Ellie Gowers) and the Izzie Derry featuring "Helter Skelter").

The essence of this intriguing band remains thankfully the same: emotional & musical honesty being channelled through excellent musicianship & melodic approaches which subtly subvert themselves in unsettling ways to illustrate the very grown up stories of the trials of adult relationships (always assuming I understand the lyrics which can be elliptic).

 

However the sound does evolve interestingly through their records. Their debut album, ‘Matters of the Heart' (reviewed in March 2018 in this magazine) had a prominent accordion throughout. ‘Beauty Scarred' was built upon the core of the King of the Alps, namely Simon Ward on bass & Paul Ingram on all other instruments & vocals and as noted, graced by guest vocals from two of the area's (nation's?) finest vocalists.

On ‘The Sun Will Rise Again' EP, Paul & Simon are joined by lead guitarist Glyn Finch & this new element of the sound really works well & offers new perspectives on the songs. Whereas the accordion tended to counterpoint the angst of the songs in a very effective manner, the edgy guitar parts on the new record enhance the senses of anxiety (a bit like they do in the work of Talking Heads?) inherent in songs which I imagine are driven by the concerns of Paul (although the material is credited to all three players, previous songs were all his & I assume the words remain his: he also produced the EP by the way).

The counterpoint now is Simon's pulsated bass which offers any sense of calmness in the songs.

I don't think I could call King of the Alps records "concept albums" (they are for starters without pretentions) but they all do have thematic natures: certainly with the two preceding releases you can understand the titles after hearing the songs. After a few plays, I'm inching towards some grasp of why this EP has this name. Arranged as a suite, the first track "Hell of the North" is presented as our "Intro" and the final "Hell of a Ride" as the "Outro", bookending the title track & "Put your Trust in Luck".

 

The "Intro" is in fact an instrumental & unusually for the band, owing a strong debt to the dubwise style, though with the afore mentioned edgy guitars.

I actually was lucky enough to hear "Put your Trust in Luck" earlier in the week & it's already wormed its way into my mind already. Archetypical King of the Alps, it has the hypnotic melodicism one finds in their oeuvre yet is structured in a slightly weird way with sudden twists & surprises & then the gentle mood is abruptly switched by the entry of squalling "Abbey Road" style lead guitar.

The title song on first listen reminded me of the sort of recitative delivery which Kevin Rowland often used but quite soon any Dexy's comparisons disappear as the track turns into the most overtly "rock" track I've ever heard from the band: heavy with a strong dose of optimism.

The "Outro" is another groover with again a dub approach utilising Simon's skills to the fore and Glyn's cool guitar lacing through the other elements. This time however we can enjoy some lyrics, though not many: it's more of a mantra. A hypnotically beautiful one at that.

 In some ways King of the Alps are a connoisseur's band: relying on understatement, subtlety and you need to unpick the songs like a Fabergé egg to get the full benefit. However that said, they are masters of the melodic pop song too: the tracks can impact upon you at once & they are earworms for me....

Web    Social media   

Share


"Better By Now" by Joe Dolman

Review

Happy New Music Friday to you all!

To celebrate the day, Joe Dolman has a brand new single "Better By Now" out for your delectation.

It seems only days since I reviewed his last single "If You Were Mine" (which is pretty true: it was only on October 11th). In that article, I ruminated on how artists might retain their key characteristics while also creating songs with enough variety to demonstrate their breadth of vision & to keep their output fresh.

Naturally with an artist of this calibre, he keeps on challenging & overcoming this paradox, gradually building a diverse body of work all of which is immediately identifiable as "Joe". No wonder his career is on the dynamic trajectory that it is....

"Better By Now" could scarcely sound less like "If You Were Mine": this comes from an entirely different place on his sonic palette. Much more from the rockier end of his repertoire, the track is taut & punchy, driven by virtually every element of the arrangement in turn from the lead vocals to the urgent strumming & snappy massed backing vocals. It arrives, drives it points home & then leaves off once they have been said in a startlingly brisk two & three quarter minutes. There is no room for messing around here.

Yet as I have said, despite the change of pace, the core artistic values of Joe's artistry remain constant:  the song is subtly arranged & craftily builds dynamics & as often, the lyrics are a sensitive perspective on aspects of relationships which reek with sincerity.

 

It has instantly become a favourite of mine... the impact is that immediate.

Yet another one to grace his live set & set the hearts of the audience a-flutter, it's worth perhaps also having a look at the context of his work. This is a really hard worker who gigs frequently & when not performing seems constantly writing & recording: yet he always has time it seems to support local music generally both at gigs & in playing with other artists. His career is involving ever more prestigious venues yet even that somewhat conceals the pressures & work which goes into putting them on. Possibly the two biggest & most anticipated gigs for 2019 were at The Assembly in Leamington & Islington's O2 Academy yet neither has gone to plan which must be pretty challenging to face. Nevertheless Joe worked to swiftly "move" the Assembly gig to All Saints Church in Leamington on December 6th (scene of his iconic 2018 gig & subsequent live EP) & the London date has been rescheduled too (it's now on February 27th). Giving into adversity doesn't seem an option & without doubt both gigs will be full of his ever growing fanbase (best get your tickets for the Leamington gig sharpish though as I believe there are very few left).

Finally, a word on the eye catching if not disconcerting sleeve art. In fact I'll leave that word to its creator, Émilie Cotterill: "It could be photomanipulation... but it could also be that his reflection sometimes has a mind of its own". Intriguing......

Web    Social media   

Share


From The Source

News

From The Source is the title of a new series of concerts at Warwick Arts Centre which focus on artists whose roots are in jazz music, yet whose music spreads far beyond the confines of the genre.

The series kicks off on Friday 8 November 2019 with Nitin Sawhney. Having recently sold out the Royal Albert Hall, in London, the DJ, producer, multi-instrumentalist, composer and occasional actor, revisits his ground-breaking 1999 album, Beyond Skin.

The release which established Nitin's reputation, it combines elements of ambient techno, trip hop, jazz, Asian music, and more, to create a politically changed collection.

Alongside tracks from Beyond Skin, Nitin - who has a new album exploring immigration out next year - also promises to drop in material from across his 20-plus year career.

From The Source continues on Saturday with a World Premiere from Stubbleman, featuring found sounds, modular synths and live piano and bass.

Stubbleman is the nom de plume of writer, producer, musician Pascal Gabriel, who has previously worked with such acts as Kylie Minogue, Dido, Ladyhawke, Bebel Gilberto, S'Express and Bomb The Bass.

Afterwards is an appearance from emerging jazz vocalist Judi Jackson and a new commission from Debris Stevenson, who describes herself as a "dyslexic writer, grime poet, working-class academic, pansexual ex-Mormon and Bashment dancing social activist from the seam between East London and Essex."

The series concludes on Sunday 10 November 2019 with Alice Zawadzki, whose music spans jazz and European folk traditions ("something of a phenomenon" reckons Mojo), and finishes with A Change Is Gonna Come: Music For Human Rights - an exploration of the power of protest music by Carleen Anderson, pianist Nikki Yeoh, Camilla George and Birmingham-based rapper Lady Sanity.

At the core of A Change Is Gonna Come are choice tracks from Gil Scott-Heron, Woody Guthrie, Nina Simone, Marvin Gaye and Sam Cooke.

  • From The Source is at Warwick Arts Centre, Coventry, from Friday 8 to Sunday 10 November 2019.
Web    Social media   

Share


"Let This One Be Mine" by Izzie Derry

Review

I find myself here writing a review which I had never anticipated. I kidded myself that I had a reasonable understanding of an artist whom I had previously reviewed  but here I am writing about a facet of Izzie Derry not mentioned in earlier articles: not that I'm complaining as I like being surprised by artists & I enjoy finding yet more new depths to their craft & artistry.

One of the themes of my recent reviews has been my admiration for the quantity & quality of her latest  work, not least that featured on her ‘Lost At Sea' EP, feeling that her arc as an artist is clearly on a steep upwards gradient.

Yet Izzie's latest single release is "Let This One Be Mine", a track you can find on her debut album "Goodbye" (from 2017) & which is thus more indicative of her solo performances of that era than the more complex band arrangements anyone attending her live shows is currently more likely to encounter.

The answer is of course that this is a re-recording with a full band, undertaken because she felt that the original production did not do full credit to the song & this tells one much about her perfectionism & commitment to her own material. My first thought actually was of John Lennon who always nursed ambitions to rerecord such classics as "Help!" or "Strawberry Fields Forever" in order to produce recorded versions which matched the sounds in his head, regardless of the popularity & acclaim of the ones released.... I sense something similar going on here.

On this new recording, Izzie works with bassmaster Jake Morris (who also mixed & mastered it), keyboardist/backing vocalist Herbie Walker, guitarist Dominic Pulleyn, drummer Hannah Websdale & violinist Gabija KaisiliauskaitÄ—: the first two of whom will be very familiar to those who have caught Izzie Derry Band gigs over the past couple of years.

 

So what of the new recording & how does it compare with the original? Well if Izzie liked the song sufficiently to revisit it in this way, it would seem plausible that many aspects should remain as she wrote it. This understandably applies to the lyrics & the overall sentiment but extends even to the acoustic guitar introduction & even the length of both versions is identical to the very second. Izzie is applying the "if it ain't broke..." principle and what we have instead are subtle enhancements informed by her musical progress in the intervening years, her changes in perception & perspective informing her vocal performance & of course the individualities of the new players. If the earlier recording has a more "folk" intonation, this one leans more towards "jazz" with a looser more mellow groove (I have to say that the almost military snare drum so prominent on the "Goodbye" cut simply sounds inappropriate once you've heard the new arrangement) and Izzie's experiences in singing have produced a vocalisation which sounds both more playful & contemplative at once. If previously the emotions were expressed wistfully, today we have full on yearning with a greater level of intensity. You certainly feel her angst & if you are not moved by it then you must have a heart made of stone. The arrangement with all its many elegant extra elements builds effectively but is so well produced that her voice & the signature guitar part remain central to your listening & the subtle players complement the song ideally.

 

This is a strong song & it certainly is presented now in a form both consistent with Izzie's ‘Lost At Sea' material & possibly more in a way to get a broader range of media attention.

Don't just take my word for it: I don't usually quote others in my reviews but I was discussing the song while writing this with Paul Newbold of Lightspark Music Photography (who has long been following her career) and his response to me was "I don't know how she's done it but she's made a superb song even better"

You can find a video of this single on YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QIWo-yg5c44

 You can catch Izzie live at the Bees Mouth in Hove if you are down that way on October 12th or on January 18th at Westview Live in Gainsborough

Web    Social media   

Share


 

"Sweet Talk" by Hannah Woof

Review

I wrote last week of the issues & tensions which must exist around even the best artists as they develop their individual voice & sound yet need to ensure each release, while being true to their own individual style & sound, is however distinct from what went before: possibly via new influences, working with new collaborators & of course via their growth as a writer & performer. Thus it is great to follow certain artists over a long period of time & see such evolution, often gradual & occasionally in leaps & bounds. Seldom if ever however can I have recorded such a contrast between one musician's latest release & their previous one. "Sweet Talk" by Hannah Woof, released today,  is a real quantum shift from its predecessor, the ‘Sleepless Nights' EP  of May 2017 (have we really had to wait two & a half years? Thank goodness the wait is now over).

The differences are considerable: radical even, though the essential qualities Hannah brings to her craft remain. Thankfully.

If you have read my earlier reviews, you'll know that Hannah's trademark has been "very fragile & haunting songs played with a very very spare style". I think the sparseness remains (Hannah seems to believe in a "less is more" approach to accentuating the excellence of her lyrics & her remarkable vocal delivery through tastefully restrained arrangements) if though the emphasis has shifted from a more "classical" previous approach on acoustic guitar or piano to something more "contemporary" using electronic sounds and a more hip hop vocalisation. (Before I go much further, I'd like to give due credit to Jack Arnold who co-wrote the song, plays on it with Hannah & produced it plus to Matt Cotterill who mixed it).

If the sound is a real shock (in a very good way), so is the lyrical content & tone. The previous EP was the product of the writer's insomnia as the title suggests & possesses a nocturnal feel. This single in contrast is a much more uptempo track (though the action in the lyrics could I suppose be still happening after dark).

 

But there is much more to it than that. The earlier songs tended towards the more reactive, being often accusatory (possibly towards a person responsible for causing the sleeplessness?) and delivered intensely in Hannah's characteristically no holds-barred wit & articulacy: the impression was of a strong person speaking her own mind but maybe coming out of a dark place ("Addicted To You" is a song I massively admire but it's not a light one). The Hannah of "Sweet Talk" is as strong & witty but it would seem a darned sight happier & in total control now of her own life.

I said she holds nothing back in the pursuit of emotional honesty & "Sweet Talk" is almost the flip side of the coin to a song such as "Blue Eyed Bastard" and delivered with as much commitment & frankly grown-up lyrics. This is a great song & I hope it gets the airplay it deserves but it won't appeal to the prudes out there. To be honest, personally I think it's to be applauded for doing so. The charts are full of "love songs" which to me simply recycle lyrical clichés & tropes on the subject whereas Hannah has written something here which is a lot of fun & rings properly true.

Like all the best music, these senses of honesty & the artist enjoying what they do underpin what I instinctively feel in the song & why I respond emotionally positively to it. And enjoy it. And I rejoice for Hannah who seems to have had a ball making it. If you use the "Sassy Rating" patented by Izzie Derry then you'd need to give it a very high one: I wouldn't argue if you wanted to give it the maximum (Hannah sounds like she is trying for it too). Think "Let's Get It On" by Marvin Gaye only more raunchy.

So there you have it: a track as inventive & true as her previous work yet which managed to surprise a fan: how great is that?

Web   

Share


Calexico and Iron & Wine announce UK tour dates for November

News

SonicPR promotion ...

Following the release of their new album ‘Years To Burn', CALEXICO AND IRON & WINE will play a string of UK dates this November as part of their UK/EU tour.

UK DATES

November

  • 18th - Usher Hall, Edinburgh
  • 19th - Philharmonic Hall, Liverpool
  • 20th - Bridgewater Hall, Manchester
  • 21st - Warwick Arts Centre, Coventry 
  • 23rd - Royal Festival Hall, London
  • 24th - Dome, Brighton


Calexico and Iron & Wine first made an artistic connection with In the Reins, the 2005 EP that brought Sam Beam, Joey Burns and John Convertino together. The acclaimed collaboration introduced both acts to wider audiences and broadened Beam's artistic horizons, but it was the shared experience of touring together in the tradition of Bob Dylan's "Rolling Thunder Revue" that cemented their bond. Their metaphorical roads diverged in the years that followed, but they kept in touch and cross-pollinated where they could. But although they often talked about rekindling their collaboration in the studio and on the stage, it wasn't until last year that their schedules aligned.

Years to Burn can't help but be different from In the Reins. Back then, Calexico entered the studio with a long list of previous collaborations (first in Giant Sand, then backing the likes of Victoria Williams and Richard Buckner) and the knowledge that they loved Sam's voice and his songs, but wondering if his material was so complete and self-contained that it lacked a way in, so hushed and delicate that it might be overwhelmed. For his part, Beam had been intimidated by their virtuosic playing and their deep comfort in an encyclopedic array of styles. "In my mind, I was a guy who knew three chords and recorded in a closet," Sam says. "They were playing big stages and were superb musicians."

Those fears were dispelled quickly. Calexico was bowled over by Beam's many talents: "The arranging, the writing, his sense of rhythm, the quality of his vocals—and then there's the experimental side of Sam," Joey says. "They were the perfect band at the perfect time for me," Sam adds. "I loved all their different sounds. They're musical anthropologists, not regurgitating but absorbing what they discover." Nearly 15 years on, "coming back to the project has to do with acknowledging how much impact the first record had for me in my life."

Beam, Burns and Convertino reconvened in Nashville for four days of recording in December 2018. Nobody was keen to retread old ground. The change of venue—from Calexico's home base of Tucson, where In the Reins was tracked—was one part of the effort. Together with Niehaus, veteran Calexico trumpet player Jacob Valenzuela and frequent Beam cohorts Rob Burger (Tin Hat Trio) on piano and Sebastian Steinberg (Soul Coughing, Fiona Apple) on bass, they settled in at the Sound Emporium, a fabled studio founded in the sixties by Cowboy Jack Clement and the site of countless landmark sessions in country and rock over the ensuing decades. Convertino got chills when he found a framed photo of R.E.M. on the wall: Document was recorded there.

Another added ingredient was engineer Matt Ross-Spang, whose recent resume includes producing Margo Price's Midwest Farmer's Daughter, working with Memphis legends like Al Green in the Sam Phillips studio that's now Ross-Spang's home turf, and winning a Grammy for mixing Jason Isbell's album Something More Than Free (another Sound Emporium project). Ross-Spang was assisted by Rachel Moore; he shares production credits with Beam, Burns and Convertino.

Beam wrote all the songs for In the Reins. He took the lead again here, bringing five songs to the session, but Burns added one of his own in the end too. They took differing approaches; Sam shared meticulous demos ahead of time and was ready with arrangement ideas and instrumental parts, while Joey spontaneous as ever, came in with concepts and an eagerness to improvise. Upon arriving in Nashville, he also penned a tune.

"Life is hard. Awesome. And scary as shit. But it can lift you up if you let it," Sam offers. "These are the things Joey and I write about now. And the title can encapsulate a lot of things. ‘Years to Burn' could mean you're cocky, you've got it made. Or, our life is ours to burn, to be inspired. Or you're burned by life, brutalized. It's an ambiguous title, because life is complicated. Let's not talk like teenagers about love, desire, pain, ‘cause we're not teenagers. And that's not a bad thing."

"This project had to find the right time," Joey concludes. "We're all different people than we were in 2004, and music helps to bridge some of the gaps. For all the things going on in our world and in each of our lives, this connection, this friendship, this love that we have—this album is a vehicle for that bond. It's a chance to see where we're at, take stock and be there for our friends.'

Share


"Against The Tide" by Ellie Gowers

Review

Some of the records I review for "Hot Music Live" come to me out of the relative blue. Others I am aware of & look forward to with great interest. A few such as today's release by Ellie Gowers of her single "Against The Tide" can be categorised as "eagerly anticipated".

Her first record since last year's ‘From Here On Out' EP, the interim wait has without doubt fuelled this feeling. As recent live reviews document, Ellie's artistic trajectory is currently rocketing. Mesmerising performances have attracted widespread applause & the buzz around the music scene is palpable: this is an artist on her way somewhere & increasingly fast. To quote ‘Love Shrewsbury': "‘One young woman made a big impression on us

this year. Ellie Gowers' exquisite voice and unique vocal style was absolutely mesmerising. She's one

to watch.'" I'd agree and so would so many others

For the record, apart from Ellie, the track features Joe Dean (guitar), Rob King (guitar), Conor Ross Harrington (drums) and Joe Johnson (bass) and was produced by Tim Allen at J & J Studios, Bristol

So what of the song itself: how does it sit with my expectations, sky high as they already were? Well "quite extraordinary" were the first two words I wrote down on the initial play. The song grabs you by the emotional throat instantly & you can tell that Ellie is holding nothing back on that front: a few moments at any of her concerts will have told you thought already though.

Something of another quantum jump forward in her creative process, this is wholly Ellie: yes you can detect the folk roots of her writing, a genre definition which has sufficed until now but one which will no longer confine her. This broods with an intensity that again no Ellie-watcher would be really surprised at & frankly must be best experienced with headphones or a very intimate space for a gig to get its full power.

The vibe owes as much to jazz as folk or maybe the work of similarly dark brooders of the P J Harvey, Nick Cave, Patti Smith ilk. With a far fuller palette of instrumental sounds at her disposal than on her previous releases, Ellie deploys them with the taste you'd expect: dropped in (often without warning) and then withdrawn as abruptly to keep you constantly on your toes & keeping you locked into the song.

Subtitled as "a conversation about societal conventions and conditioning.", it seems that the title probably refers to the big forces of fate & nature which shape our lives & are simply too strong to resist entirely and against which one must necessarily be prepared to contend if one wishes to stand up for ones beliefs in a bewildering & potentially hostile world. As much as a conversation, this song challenges us to think about things and come up with our own answers, however complex and nuanced they need to be & however difficult the process may be. Ellie shies away from nothing in this track & expects the same in return.

 

Although as I say, the song is in that sense metaphorical, I am interested in how three of our finest local writers, namely Ellie, Izzie Derry & Stylusboy have released absolutely superb maritime title songs in 2019 considering how landlocked Warwickshire is... (though I accept that Ellie & Izzie have coastal bases too). I wonder if this triptych carries some higher meaning? Or am I just easily confused?

 

 

 At any rate, to cut to the chase, "Against The Tide" is going to move you. Furthermore it exceeds even my expectations. It's been a bumper year for superb Warwickshire & Coventry songwriting, among the best ever & even so, this record may well crop up on "best single of the year" type lists by those who feel like picking out individual tracks in this manner.

 

Buy the record & for goodness sake try to catch her equally impressive live performances. This is a performer on top of her game in so many ways yet promising to develop so much further in ways beyond my predictive powers.

Web    Social media   

Share


The Hatstand Band

Review

Although I have seen them play before, and greatly enjoyed their performances, I have not actually ever given them a full review for some reason (I have referred to them in the context of festivals only), so I take pleasure in being able to tell you about the Hatstand Band's gig at the Town House in Leamington last evening.

This very flexible group, based upon a core of Kate Vassalos on guitar & Keith Nickless on double bass and harmonica operate with a bewildering combination of lineups including often very impromptu guests. On this occasion they were a six piece with regular cajon player Stix, frequent guest Sophia Vassalos on vocals (much the same core operate on other occasions as Sophia's band), a lead (electric) guitarist & one of those guests, Bob on bodhran & spoons.

I had to check with Kate regarding the mixture of originals and covers since a high proportion of the songs were not known to me: this indeed is part of their great strength as their own songs are hard to distinguish from the covers so seamlessly do they fit it among deliberately chosen fairly obscure "dark Americana" cover versions (though a few I recognised, not least the rousing & audience pleasing version of Marc Cohn's "Walking in Memphis").

The set is amazingly eclectic to be honest with songs which might be fitted into various categories: folk, blues, soul, latin and even one Russian sounding one, though their "dark Americana" self description is apt given the numbers of deaths in the lyrics and the devil pops up in virtually every single song (whisky does quite often too). Their version of "Banks of the Ohio' is even arranged to better bring out the morbid lyrics better than the usual & less appropriate poppy upbeat versions do.

Just as the setlist is eclectic, so really is the sound. The band is a wonderful variety of ages & experiences, each of which brings something different to the mix (Fairies Band vocalist Tinky: check them out on ‘Hot Music Live Presents Volume One', was present & asking her reaction to the band, this was the point she wanted me particularly to make in this review). And I racked my brains but could not remember ever seeing a band featuring both a cajon & bodrhan previously. Particularly as the evening wore on & the songs got more and more rousing, the harmonies three singers (Keith, Kate & Sophia) were able to create became ever more stunning.

So how did they go down? Very well is the answer. There may have been multiple deceases & demons but the songs themselves prove who has the best tunes & are played with a great deal of love. That alone is one major reason why I too appreciated their performance & wanted to review them. As I (too) often say in my pieces, I tend only to respond to honesty in performance & to musicians who clearly enjoy what they are playing & that is the tipping point for whether I feel I want to write about them.  I felt their commitment to the music & I'm sure the enthusiastic audience did too. It's something you don't really need (or cannot) put into words. And thankfully Keith's bass didn't explode as it spectacularly did when I saw them at the Godiva Festival once.

There have been some great live acts on at this venue in recent weeks: before the Hatstand Band I greatly enjoyed seeing Doc Brown & Tile Hill Billy (Wes Finch & Jools Street) and the Hansel Brothers/Evergreen: three great evenings with the pub really buzzing in response to the acts: an excellent atmosphere for live, good natured music with patrons who appreciate it. Look out for more with the Folly Brothers coming up soon too.

Social media   

Share


Old and gold

"Try" and "Leaving" by Jake Rizzo

...

It is said of several aspects of life that "a week is a long time" within them: to the list we might now add the career of Jake Rizzo.

2 photographs
More


JAWS – Empire Coventry - 30th Nov 2019

...

A SonicPR promotion .

1 photographs
More


"If You Loved Me" by Jake Rizzo

...

It is always a great pleasure to review excellent music, but to focus on a debut single is that extra bit special as you feel like a traveller ...

1 photographs
More


"If You Were Mine" by Joe Dolman

...

One element which seems to play a part in making the difference between local artists with bags of talent & original ideas whose careers seem to ...

1 photographs
More


"Late Again" by Earlybird

...

This review is extremely fresh being of a debut single by a band whom I've not yet seen live yet and ironically I have seen more great photos of ...

1 photographs
More


"You Are Light" by The Silver Wye

...

Last November, in "Hot Music Live", I reviewed a song called "Pick Me Up" by an entity calling itself The Silver Wye.

1 photographs
More


Spandau Ballet Star To Play The Assembly In 2020!

...

A SonicPR promotion .

1 photographs
More


"Even Though We Are Strangers" by Speak, Brother

...

It's ironic that in such short succession I should write song reviews for bands whom I hold in high esteem yet whom I have only previously ...

1 photographs
More


Pitch Black (NZ)

...

Spacific, in alliance with Disco Gecko Recordings and Dubmission Records, are proud to present an evening of outernational electronica featuring live ...

2 photographs
More


SWING ERA TO DANCE INTO LEAMINGTON SPA AS PART OF UK TOUR

...

Down for the Count Swing Orchestra bring vintage jazz sound to Loft Theatre this NovemberThe Down for the Count Swing Orchestra will bring the sounds ...

1 photographs
More


Agoraphobia, The Smoking Kills, Just For Now, Women Gone Missing - 18/10/19, The Tin Coventry

...

An incredible night of rock music hosted by Catch 22 Promotions!Agoraphobia are the new trailblazers of Spanish Alt-Rock.

1 photographs
More


"Need A Friend" by The Caprines

...

One of my very favourite of local bands happens to be Coventry based four piece The Caprines (they comprise Ed Kimberley on drums, Dave Toulson on ...

1 photographs
More


New Leamington Spa-based duo, Brook, release debut album, "Built You For Thought"

...

Brook press release .

2 photographs
More


LEAMINGTON BEER + MUSIC FESTIVAL 2019

...

A few of my images from the music stages at this years Leamington Beer + Music Festival, another success both in the music and a wonderful collection ...

10 photographs
More


Line up for Leamington Beer and Music Festival 2019

...

13 and 14th September.

1 photographs
More


Blues Extra caught in the act

...

Remember Summer? Here's Blues Extra with an evocatve take on Don't believe a word at Napton festival.
More

Alan's memorial igg

...

Another amazing fundraiser production from Peter Drew with sets from The Hepsters, Carrick, The Intruders, Woodstock 68 and The Jolly Rogers.

1 photographs
More


Clemency at the Warwick Beer Festival

...

Richly textured grooves, emotive vocals and powerful original material.

4 photographs
More


"Sunny Lady" by Evergreen

...

I think that I can safely say that I have not before reviewed a more eagerly anticipated debut single than "Sunny Lady" by Evergreen.

1 photographs
More


New single from Jack Blackman and the Beautiful Wreck - No Silver Lining

...

'No Silver Lining' is the debut single from Jack Blackman and the Beautiful Wreck.

2 photographs
More


Kenilworth Arts Festival 2019 Listings

...

M Seven Public Relations promotion .

9 photographs
More


'Routes' by Stylusboy

...

I've said it before, but reviewing for "Hot Music Live" is a real privilege in so many ways.

1 photographs
More


The Countdown Is On For Kenilworth Arts Festival 2019

...

M Seven Public Relations press release .

1 photographs
More


HOLLY & THE HOUNDS AND STRIPCLUB STREETFOOD

...

This was a fine Bank Holiday Sunday evening in the canal side setting of the Tom O' The Wood in Rowington, glorious weather the chilled out ...

8 photographs
More


'Fourth in Line' EP by Fourth in Line

...

It is entirely possible that although this is their first review in the magazine, you may already be aware of Fourth in Line.

1 photographs
More


Wayne Hussey extensive ‘Salad Daze Tour'

...

A SonicPR promotion .

2 photographs
More


CROPREDY 2019 GALLERY

...

Loved my visit to Cropredy again this year, fab to see Wildwood Kin on the big stage going down a storm while other highlights on and my visit ...

9 photographs
More


The Mechanicals Band with special guest Ellie Gowers

...

Well here I am again, this time reviewing not one but two artists on whom I fear I may have already used up my supply of appropriate superlatives in ...

3 photographs
More


Sam McNulty with Angelo Cardone & Bill Cameron

...

Few "Hot Music Live" readers will need introducing to the name nor talents of Sam McNulty.

5 photographs
More


Burning Salt

...

One of the issues which is a perennial worry for me in writing for "Hot Music Live" is how to cover even the most excellent of artists, the ones we ...

4 photographs
More