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Coventry, Kenilworth, Leamington Spa, Rugby, Solihull, Warwick, Stratford and Warwickshire

The magazine - news, reviews and interviews for the local scene

Fresh and funky

"Brain Cell" by Autopilot

Review

Having reviewed them live previously, I am pleased to now tell you of the brand new single from Autopilot: "Brain Cell".

I hope that you have heard previous singles such as "Can You Feel The Love" (which has appeared on ‘Hot Music Live Presents Volume Two' https://hotmusiclivepresents.bandcamp.com/album/hot-music-live-presents-volume-two), "Glass of Gold" or "Invincible"?

It can't have been easy for the band (who comprise, as you probably don't require telling, Jack Schofield on lead vocals and guitar, Andy Hopkins on bass guitar and Chris Lewis on drums): given the presence of a former member of a very well known & successful group, Autopilot must have been wary of being crushed at birth by weight of expectations & undermined by comparisons.

They seem to have escaped both quite successfully as far as I can see, and there seems also to have been careful thinking on how to do this. They have been building their career & reputation in an admirably low key way, gigging & crafting their own sound, often in quite small venues & at the same time creating a strong setlist of original material, making sure that the songs they have felt best represented them were released first. The result is a reputation now forged as a live band of genuine class & of a group capable of writing the most sound of tracks. A lot of hard work doubtlessly, but that has paid off. Now the wider world awaits.

Excellent as earlier singles were, "Brain Cell" does top them I feel for maturity in several respects, not just the subject matter. The song opens in a very pop mode with a catchy keyboard riff (which reoccurs periodically) and is generally from that end of the spectrum of their work. It's possibly Jack's best vocal to date especially in terms of expression & articulating the meaning:  the frequent easing back to the point of drop out of instruments helps to foreground the particularly strong lyrics which seem to address issues of communication, obsession, guilt over bad behaviour & regret , with the singer looking for a way forwards (and possibly back) a song as I said  of maturing  with trademark Autopilot surges of sound and arrangement, occasional switches to processed vocals, & a great guitar sound, although the solo was a little buried (it's a shame this wasn't given the same space the singing was).

Aside from reinforcing traits which reoccur in their work to date (the synth hooks, massed vocals etc) which certainly establish who the band are & who they are not, the song also really showcases their grasp of dynamics, with very restrained sections giving way to furious deluges of bass & drums to add variation & effect to what they are telling us & which obviously will work really well live. They really have thought this all out very well & have the nous to put it into excellent practice.

 

Look out too for the video for "Brain Cell' which can be seen via this link

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l7X_MkSZ64U

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"Push and Pull" by John Connearn

Review

It seems so recently that I was telling you all about the debut single by John Connearn, the appropriately entitled "First Things First" and although it's still fresh in my memory, it was actually over a month ago. Nevertheless, things are moving fast for John & today we come to his follow-up release, that is to say "Push and Pull": which has come out on the interesting date of 22/02/2020

In many ways this is similar to its predecessor: it is again an instrumental track which while focused reasonably enough on John's guitar, like the first single has excellent drums also prominent, yet "Push & Pull" has a distinction of its own.  Again, tastefully composed & played with a jazzy inclination, leaning in fact in a Crusaders direction I suppose, the title may refer to the structure of the track given that it definitely has two alternating moods, the first having more of an acoustic feel (it sounds like it might be layered & processed acoustic guitar to me) and the other being more urgently played electric sounding. It's possible that one is indicative of pushing & the other of .. well I'm sure you can guess.

As before, John can play startling runs really fast but he plays them so you can follow the melody lines: there are careful effects added to his playing for texture, but the overall sound is clean with no distortion and the tune is cohesive & memorable enough to make it clear that this is no showboating exercise: he's playing so you enjoy his song, not to try to elicit your worship. John is happy to use the word "noodling" in respect of what he does, and I can see why, but this is not self indulgence: it's a genuine song, albeit one where it tells its tale without finding it necessary to use words: which after all is a facet of so much music especially classical & jazz & it's interesting that instrumentals, while once much more popular in the "popular" section of music, seem out of favour presently. Maybe John can help bring them back into our experience?

You can catch John playing at Ziferblat in Coventry on 28th February & I'm sure you'll hear his two singles played.

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Barnabus Album Launch Gig

News

With Leamington rock band Barnabus, formed way back in 1970 having an Album Launch gig in Warwick next month it seemed a good time to look back to my only show by the band at St. Patrick's Irish Club, Leamington Spa back in 2009.

This big gig takes place on the night of Friday 20th March at the Nelson Club in Warwick with support by the Jaykays, tickets available behind the bar of the Nelson Club (ask for Clint) with only 140 available.

Andrew Lock

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"Nothing Good Is Wasted" by Rob Halligan

Review

Today I am pleased to be able to tell you about a new release from Rob Halligan: "Nothing Good Is Wasted" which is a taster for us from his upcoming album, ‘Always Heading Home'. (Check out the review in "Hot Music Live" in May 2019 for his ‘We All Write The Songs').

 

The new song is a delicate piano led ballad which builds gently, adding an acoustic guitar & a few extra layers but that must be to add textures & variety since there is no grand crescendo nor climax: this is a simple heartfelt track with as much meaning at the beginning as at the end, so a consistency of sound is wholly appropriate.

Although there are eco themes embedded in the words, overall it would appear to be a manifestation of Rob's spiritual beliefs & specifically that there exists a place beyond the physical existence of this world & that things of beauty & value continue to live there once their earthly sojourn is passed. The melody & arrangement works effectively to evoke these timeless & infinite qualities & also to turn one's own mind in the direction of contemplation of the eternal.

Though once described by the BBC in relation to artists of the calibre of Bruce Springsteen and Billy Bragg (which is valid of course in terms of his songwriting skill, his honesty in writing & his commitment to writing about lives of real people), this type of song is a long way from the usual lyrical interests of such writers.

As an artist with a wide fanbase within & beyond the UK, Rob tours lot outside our immediate area & indeed has many shows planned for this year, both to play his new album and others such as ‘Psalm' (released in 2018)

However you can catch him locally on these occasions:

25th February at The Wurzel Bush Folk Club in Rugby

5th April at Willow and Tool's Music Parlour at the Harvester in Long Itchington

6th June at Motofest in Coventry (on Greyfriars' Green)

14th June at the

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Ian Todd

Feature

We cover so many multi-talented artists in "Hot Music Live": not just musicians but the photographers, visual artists & producers whom they work with. Many of these artists possess fascinating hinterlands too as they possess & ply other skills in often completely different areas. Few however are quite the Renaissance figure that the subject of this feature is.

I do hope that the name Ian Todd is already known to you. If it rings a fainter bell, it may be that you read the credit notes for "Hot Music Live Presents Volume Two" and noticed him as a member of Shanghai Hostage & producer of their music & that of Sophie Hadlum. You may too have spotted his song "Bohemian Hymns"on the HillzFM chart. If so, I hope you voted for him & all the other HMLP artists.

In fact Ian is a most prolific musician with two albums ‘Groaning Up' and ‘Bohemian Hymns' previously released and a third one underway. He is a writer, a performer  (on guitar, keyboards, bass, mandolin and he sings too) a producer , a teacher  and also a film maker (check out the video he & Sophie made for her recent single "Winter Came Around Too Fast " or the video for his January 2020 single "The Music Box"  on his website https://www.mriantodd.com)

What perhaps is most impressive in terms of prolific output is the fact that he has just finished releasing a single every week for the past seven  months. In a period when I'm noting the bounteous output of several local artists, this still must set the record.

Listening to all this music, the first thing that strikes me is that it is no surprise that he works so well as part of the multi-genre/no genre Shanghai Hostage. As I suggested in my recent review of their new single "The King" "Like all the artists I love, Shanghai Hostage just go with their hearts & where their muse leads them: they don't seem interested in emulating anyone else & wherever & to whatever they may be hostages, it certainly isn't to the straitjacket of genre labelling. This is just pure, truthful music...". This holds true for Ian as a solo artist just as validly.

Ian too seems to set himself no false constraints nor be bound by the shackles of genre expectations: he goes where his particular inclination takes him from the classical stylings of last month's (instrumental) single (wherein one can see much connectivity with Sophie's solo work) to the massed vocals of the title track of ‘Bohemian Hymns" , the affecting  paean to "New Street Station" of 2019 whether led by his guitar, piano,  samples or even  snare drum shuffles, stripped back or full band arrangements. Personal other favourites include "Red Carousel" "Citizens of Nowhere" or "Parasites" but honestly they all appeal: I just baulked at listing every track he's recorded. Check them out for yourselves: you'll enjoy the process. The term "eclectic" fits him like a glove & few tracks sound anything like each other: which I admire & respect but it might not chime as easily with those parts of the music media who feel more comfortable finding little boxes to force independently minded artists into.

He even has a seasonal single in "Christmas Drum ‘N' Bass" wherein great musicianship meets humour & I think that that this element is a key one for describing what Ian is about: it crops up repeatedly throughout his work both in lyrics & music (and in video: that for "The King" by Shanghai Hostage is a prime example) and reinforces the sense of his writing from the heart.

Other key collaborators apart from Sophie, Beth, Richard et al include Kirk Hastings on saxophone and some harmonies, Emilia Moniszko for her art work and some of his drums are looped courtesy of thelooploft.com. Emilia and Kirk are a part of a company called "Blunt and Brave" who help people , especially creative ones, get their talent  in front of people who ought  to see it.

Ian's philosophy is summed up thus:  "I make music in a unique way for unique people. None of us are perfect, we all have flaws; this is the one thing we all have in common. When you feel like no one relates to you, that's ok, know you're not alone and this music and community proves that". It's really hard not to fully embrace this & certainly applaud it & I believe it is really congruent with what "Hot Music Live" stands for and also I'd think chimes with so many of the artists who appear in the magazine or on volumes of "Hot Music Live Presents"

You can explore Ian's diverse & splendid work via several platforms:

 

https://open.spotify.com/artist/11hSReg8WO1Z8H3J4aKRwV?si=B7_MvLZQRKiOYBL0RUDwpg

https://www.youtube.com/user/MrIantodd/

https://twitter.com/MrIanTodd

https://www.instagram.com/mriantodd/

https://www.facebook.com/mriantodd/

 

https://www.mriantodd.com

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"The King" by Shanghai Hostage

Review

Today I'm really pleased to be reviewing the new, the brand new, single by Shanghai Hostage within minutes of its video being publicly released (it's also coming to Spotify etc soon): I can't always promise this speed of response but you may safely on this occasion link it to my level of enthusiasm for this band: one of the most popular on the Coventry & Warwickshire scene. Hopefully you are already in possession of their very  fine song "Nomad" on "Hot Music Live Presents Volume 2" and also their eponymous 2019 debut EP on which it first appeared.

 

"The King" (for that's its name) also marks the video debut with Shanghai Hostage of drummer Anna Harris. (Though previous drummer Dom McAvera plays on the recording)

Anna joins Shanghai Hostage stalwarts Sophie Hadlum (vocals, clarinet and keyboards), Beth Black (guitar), Ian Todd (guitar) & Richard Brown (bass) and the band have not only recorded this song  but a whole new EP's worth of material for release on March 22nd. Their producer (who has done an excellent job) is Ian Whitehead. Look out for my review of that as I'm certainly hotly anticipating it.

 

Where to start? The music or the video? Both are really great & deserve equal billing, but I think the music perhaps should start.

 

The band, if pressed, self describe as "multi genre" but musing on their work, I wonder when "multi genre" becomes "no single genre"? Like all the artists I love, Shanghai Hostage just go with their hearts & where their muse leads them: they don't seem interested in emulating anyone else & wherever & to whatever they may be hostages, it certainly isn't to the straitjacket of genre labelling.

 

This is just pure, truthful music & as funky as another word beginning with the same letter and containing another one later too. No wonder they are so popular: the music is as infectious as you like and will clearly fill the floor when played live. All the band give it some (and more), none more so than Sophie's passionate vocals which go the very hi-energy end of the group's spectrum. The playing provides a platform for this & while just as energetic yet simultaneously offer a sense of cool: which adds to the lyrical effect which concerns observation of some alpha male type: the band are dissecting him & laughing at him as much as describing him. It's hard not to share their joy at what they are doing with their words & their playing. These musicians possess all the right chops, have the taste to deploy them well & form such a tight unit.

 

A fair bit of the impression the song leaves comes from the hilarious & spirited video which, for the moment, is how you are all going to engage with "The King". There have been several superb videos of songs I've reviewed recently: beautifully shot, evocative & lyrical (not least for Sophie's recent solo single "Winter Came Around Too Fast"), but this takes us back to the glory days of the music video as story. Couched as multiple metaphors, we see the title figure as disco poser (we don't often get urinal use shots in music videos)  & literal medieval king. Which is he? Both possibly & certainly both aspects illustrate what they are trying to tell us about him. You'll keep on wanting to play this one. The details are so many & so compelling that I think the only thing for you to do is watch it here:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TjoZj5BjKtI

 

I can't possibly do justice to it in words & any attempt would probably spoil it for you anyway.

 

 

What more can I add about this wonderful band? To me they have it all going for them. Everyone I know loves them & they convert people who hear them for the first time. They play with great skill but also wit, humour & humanity. They have the courage to be themselves & defy categorisation, yet their work is truly accessible & frankly "The King' sounds extremely radio friendly: may they have the great success they deserve with it.  Shanghai Hostage say things no one else has thought to say in the way they say them: lots of people have elements of talent but it's how you use it & the ability to use it with wit & discernment which really appeals to me & I suspect those reading this.

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"Getting Place" by The Silver Wye

Review

The Silver Wye, like any great river, rolls majestically on, picking up speed in the release of its songs.

Today, they release their third single, entitled "Getting Place" to celebrate the rising of this month's Full Moon.

(Check out "Hot Music Live" archives for reviews of their previous singles:  "You Are Light" was reviewed on both  October 3rd & December 22nd  2019 and "Pick Me Up" on November 14th 2018).

What an interesting & thoughtful project this is to be sure: there are so many layers to the creative onion: and that's not even taking into account the actual songs.

The first of these I loosely describe to myself as one of transcendence, bordering on the spiritual.

This manifests itself in several ways. It starts with the release of records on days which can either be associated with celestial phenomena, such as today's lunar one or the winter solstice on which "You Are Light" appeared,  or with ancient calendars & cultural celebrations: quite probably both. Next, the artwork, whether the photos or videos, which reinforce this aspect, and lastly of course the themes & feels of the tracks.

The second theme, certainly most pronounced with this single, is a crossover with the focus of another band of The Silver Wye originator Wes Finch, namely The Mechanicals. This latter group set poetic texts from Shakespeare to Larkin and many others, to music & continue to collaborate in a range of literary projects. "Getting Place" in fact contains another complex & dense mesh of allusions: the title coming from Cormac McCarthy's "No Country for Old Men" but the lyrics owing much to the work of Shirley Jackson & of Stephen King. This gives the transcendence aspect a much darker twist with the more chilling & sombre side of the supernatural coming to the fore (I wonder if Wes conceived this song as a counterpoint to "You Are Light"?) and of course the full moon has a great beauty but it also has lycanthropic properties. Even Lucifer's original name conveys the idea of light & here the Devil stalks the woods & makes Faustian pacts at the titular location.

Which brings us via a strange path to the song itself, wrought again by Wes at Crooked Room studio in Yorkshire with producer Isaac McInnes and bassist Bradley Blackwell. I hope no Faustian pacts were involved in its making.

No surprises at all in the quality of the writing, performance nor production: just as one would expect. However the track takes another giant step along the path Wes is leading his fans on this project, away from our expectations of the music he does & hence our complacencies within it. The Silver Wye was conceived in order to explore musical styles away from the folk & he has been gentle with us, each release taking us further on that journey. This song certainly has Wes features: his distinctive delivery & inability to escape writing beautiful tunes whatever the context. However the form, though shimmering, is highly rhythmic & this is greatly reinforced with constant repetition of lines & phrases, mantra-like, creating a groove centred track.

This  is far from your standard dance song though: the imagery is to say the least compelling & frequently startling to the point of disturbing. If Wes wishes to shake us up musically, he matches that with the lyrics, twisted pictures being painted over a disarming melody for extra effect. To return to the "No Country for Old Men" theme, the track is almost Coen Brothers in (musical) style for this approach. Who else would write of a "Lyle Lovett smile"? (And let's not forget that in addition to his often sinister smile, Lyle is both another musician & an actor in the sort of films Wes is evoking: layers & layers of meaning just pile up here). A sinister willow, possibly that from Tolkien, also plays a significant & signifying part...

As the track progresses, it twists further: more unsettling chords & small dissonances are added & the vocal delivery gets more terse & anguished. By the end it is a howl of pain & warning: the cheroot smoking  blue suited figure is a real danger that may have been recognised too late. Watch out for him in the wild wood by the light of the full moon my friends..... Whatever deal you make with him, believe me it's not worth it.

 

This is a stunningly effective song on so many levels & it certainly has the potential to be seen as a significant landmark in Wes' musical career. I'd also really like to hear it used on a movie soundtrack where surely its natural home must be.  Quite possibly with Lyle Lovett playing Mephistopheles.  And as I said last time out, look out for Silver Wye live dates in 2020.....

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'Take It From Me' by Izzie Derry

Review

One conundrum I face with reviewing the calibre of artist I tend to focus on (it's an enjoyable challenge really) is how to handle it when people you really admire still manage to exceed even your own sky high expectations?

What words do you use in later pieces when you have already used up your superlatives in earlier ones? I faced this with trying to describe the other week how Titine La Voix's superb voice had got even more superb. Today's challenge is to try to describe to you the new EP from Izzie Derry, ‘Take It From Me' which comes out on February 23rd (you can pre-order it from tomorrow & actually get the title track at that moment) when I raved so much about the material on her ‘Lost At Sea' EP from last April: songs which then & now I believed were her best to date & I certainly wasn't alone in thinking that.

Now I've heard her  four new ones & already other people with really great perspectives, either due to their professional experience or from having followed her career for a long time, are again joining me in dubbing it "her best ever": even better than the last lot & that set the bar very high.

As a sort of transitional route between the two EPs, as I reported last month, Roger Lomas remixed the track "Learn To Grow" from ‘Lost At Sea' as a single, but now, as I also mentioned in the review, we come to a set of tracks recorded from scratch at his studio. Many indicators of artists' progress must be quite subtle to pick up, but in Izzie's case to get the approval of a Grammy winning producer & band like Fairport Convention within a few months of each other, the story this tells is a really clear one. She's rated by those who really know.

Working with the close band of collaborators she has had over the last couple of years,(the lineup being Izzie Derry, vocals & guitar, Jake Morris on bass, Herbie Walker on keyboards & backing vocals, Tom Hammerton on electric guitar & Noah Haines on drums)  the new songs are  "All For Something", "Now I See", "Fire" and "Take It From Me".

If Izzie's musical progression can be rendered graphically as a steep upwards curve, then perhaps her own perceptions of her life in general can also be followed with some clarity via another medium too: her songs.  The vast majority of them are in depth self examinations of herself, her life & her reflections on the world she inhabits: and they are both soul searching & beautifully articulated. If her ‘Goodbye' album was the work of a writer leaving home, ‘Lost At Sea' was a series of musings on her subsequent internal as well as external journey and now we have Chapter Three.

"All For Something" opens the EP with a theme of challenging self doubt (knowing Izzie you won't be surprised to hear that despite her rigorous self analysis, she does locate positives). Lyrically it is her most mature to date with elements of opposing thoughts having to be reconciled & there is an element of accepting the possibility of failure which the pure optimism of earlier songs didn't so readily admit. Musically, the progression is again a big jump forwards: although her work with a band since ‘Goodbye' has brought excellent new textures & nuances to her songs, this one really is a "full" arrangement with Roger's skill building a much more "band" sound, powerful, with hints of modern jazz & full of little touches which add a range of emphases to the various twists & turns of the lyrics.

"Now I See" is maybe Izzie's first really adult romantic song and again self doubt is part of her thinking (we are blessed indeed with wonderful local musicians of skill & sensitivity but you can't help feeling for some of them as people: I've said as much in recent reviews of Joe Dolman & Ollie Bond and now we have another: the line between sensitive & ego free self examination & "beating oneself up" can be a thin one.  May they all enjoy happy times ahead). This one musically is a little closer to her recent types of arrangement, steadily building with instruments joining in to ramp up the emotional clout and again to vary the sonic picture subtly.

"Fire" is Izzie like you have never heard her on record before: this really emotive track has a power of its own & leaves the "folk" box she has been filed in hitherto in her career way behind her (she now refers to herself as "folk rock" on social media): this is a calling card for her as a diverse style performer, being much more jazz/blues. It certainly reminds me how I felt when I heard her with her full band in the summer of 2019: used to her by herself or with a small band, the sheer loudness was a (pleasant) shock as was the sight of them genuinely rocking out. In a way I suppose a parallel would by with Ellie Gowers' recent & equally astonishing "Against the Tide": a break out of constraints type of quantum leap. Like every song on this EP, great as her voice has always been, I think this is the moment for Izzie to sing this song as her vocalisation owes much to her accumulating experience as much as to her innate talent: we are talking ‘Torch Song Izzie' here. It sizzles with emotion & truth and for the first time on the record the emotional & internal doubts are pushed aside for a moment.

The title track, which as I said above can be accessed from the 9th & so is possibly the first song you'll hear,  concludes this stunning set & like "Now I See" it's a builder and the closest to her previous styles in terms of sound & lyrical concerns. I'm going to put myself on the line here (just watch me get it wrong), but it sounds more like the ideas she was exploring on ‘Lost At Sea' so I'm wondering if it was the earliest of these four to be written? However, on the other hand it does speak with a confidence of tone consistent with overcoming the previously expressed self doubts so....

Roger in his inimitable way has taken an existing gem of a talent and added extra polish: his work enhances Izzie's songs & shows them off to their best advantage & never imposes upon them. He knows so much about how to structure the arrangements & you can hear that & his approach to mixing ensures that the songs themselves have an almost indefinably new way of sounding to her previous ones.

Above all of course, this is an EP of progression: five musicians spending more & more time playing together & learning how to do so to greater & greater effect. A writer who is exploring more & more exciting possibilities for expressing herself & whose voice is adapting itself to all of them. A triumph & a major career milestone.

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Old and gold

"The Middle" (Acoustic Version) by Joe Dolman

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I have recently accused Joe Dolman of being prolific in his output and here he is again with a brand new release a month since I last reviewed him.

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"In The Moment" by Henery

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I first reviewed Henery & his music for "Hot Music Live" eleven months ago when I saw him  supporting Ellie Gowers: "Henery was a revelation.

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Roddy Woomble - Announces Coventry gig

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RODDY WOOMBLE ANNOUNCES NEW EP + SHARES VIDEO FOR LEAD SINGLE "EVERYDAY SUN" - WATCH HERE + EXTENSIVE UK LIVE DATES FOR ...

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Clemency live at the Town House

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I expect we all agree that music can actually do things to us & for us: improve our mood & morale, lift our spirits, transform our psyches.

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"On the Come Down" by River of the Dog

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I must admit to being a little low when I woke up this morning.

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BERHN

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As promised, after my review of Kirsty Clarke's new track, "Greatest of Partners", I thought you'd like a piece on her other venture, ...

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"Greatest of Partners" by Kirsty Clarke

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Welcome to another of my series of reviews of Coventry & Warwickshire musicians whom I hold in very high regard yet have hitherto failed to ...

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Interview with David Page singer/songwriter with DABB4

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Question : When did you begin writing ?Answer : At 16y ears I began writing lyrics to songs then music .

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Titine La Voix Live

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It has been far too long since I had last caught a full Titine La Voix live set.

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Leamington Assembly Memories

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With the return of the Leamington Assembly it seems a good time to take a look back over my years covering gigs at this excellent venue and look at ...

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"Train" by Stone Bear

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I do hope you enjoyed the Stone Bear song "Bring A Little Love" which appeared on ‘Hot Music Live Presents Volume One'? Now Jeff Dennis ...

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Thomas Truax Announces 'New Music Machines' UK Tour

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A SonicPR promotion .

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"Sky Blue Pink" by Daffod'i'll

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When recently I reviewed no fewer than three Daffod'i'll albums in one fell swoop in a catch up exercise, if you looked at the photos ...

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'All Pretty Real' by The Old Number 7 Band

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When I saw the Old Number 7 Band at the Railway Inn in Leamington on Saturday, while they were not playing, the venue piped music was some of the ...

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The Old Number 7 Band at the Railway Inn

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What a great way to start off 2020.

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"Satellites" by Danny Ansell & Co

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‘Satellites'   is the most recent single by Danny Ansell & Co (Danny Ansell on vocals and guitars, Roger Greasby on ...

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Preview of "Don't Go Playing With A Young Girl's Heart" by Abz Winter

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Back when The Clash began, their manager, Bernie Rhodes, instructed them to "write about what you know", advice which took them along the route we ...

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"When I Went Away" by Ollie Bond

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I find myself mentioning ‘artists on a roll' increasingly frequently these days: not every artist works to the same pace & lord knows many ...

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"Learn To Grow" by Izzie Derry

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It's odd: the more reviews you write, the more patterns emerge.

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"In A Year" by Izzie Derry

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December 12th is a date many people have possibly been looking forwards to or dreading for various reasons.

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APE Night Returns!

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Some excellent news for lovers of music which dares to be a bit different.

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"Hot Music Live Presents" Volume Two - Review

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Album review by Mae Simkin from Music, Drums and MeRead original article hereAlmost a year after the release of Volume One, Coventry & ...

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A trio by Dill

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Something which as a reviewer I am keenly aware of is that so many artists are releasing their material in the form of EPs currently.

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"The Middle" by Joe Dolman

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I think that we can all by now agree that Joe Dolman is one of the most talented & popular artists from Coventry & Warwickshire & to that ...

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"Fool (Funk)" by Antonia Kirby

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Déjà vu: again.

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Preview of Rheo's upcoming EP

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We live in exciting times! I have never known such a great time for local creativity and for some reason there has been a large number of gigs & ...

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Brass Hip Flask live

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It is always a challenge finding the right words for any review: trying to describe one medium in another is itself tricky & then if you review ...

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"First Things First" by John Connearn

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John Connearn will be a name already well known to the aficionados of the local music scene & as the new decade dawns, will become better known ...

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"Christmas Brought You Here" by The Rising

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A couple of thoughts occurred to me as I started this review.

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"You Are Light" by The Silver Wye (Slight Return)

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I'm sorry but I'm afraid I'm going to have to instil a touch of déjà vu in you.

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